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Across the bridge from southern Sweden is Denmark, which chose to go the other way and decriminalize prostitution. The two countries form a sort of natural policy experiment. By 2007, according to Prof. Waltman, Denmark had about 15 times more prostitutes per capita than Sweden did – many of them migrant women trafficked from Romania and Nigeria. Now that Sweden is a hostile climate for traffickers, they tend to stick to more lucrative countries.
Iceland and Norway – two other progressive, feminist, northern countries – have adopted the Swedish model. But in Canada, the ideologies are flipped. Here, conservatives applaud the Swedish model, while progressives, academics, feminists and the media overwhelmingly ridicule it.
Prof. Waltman, who has been following Canada’s debate closely, thinks these people are seriously wrong. Decriminalization is a failed experiment, he argues. “When the German parliament decided at the end of the nineties to decriminalize, the idea was to make prostitution safer. Women would sign onto social security, and they would be destigmatized, and they would work in brothels and be safe.”
But no one signed up for social security, the sex trade was not destigmatized and brothels, he says, are not particularly safe. Worst of all, prostitution has exploded. “Most women are obviously not doing it by choice,” he says. “Most of them have been profoundly traumatized and want to get out. If you legalize it, it’s legalizing slavery, because they have no real choice.”
That’s the argument that sticks with me. I honestly don’t care if Terri-Jean Bedford operates her house of pain out of her nice suburban bungalow. Most sex workers aren’t her. Nor are they strapped co-eds working toward their masters’ degrees. They’re women at the bottom of the heap, too often aboriginal, who’ve been badly damaged and believe they have no other options.
As Ms. Bergquist says, “Anyone who believes there is such a thing as a happy prostitute should walk down the street with us one night and look these women in the eye. And then I’d like to see if they still believe that’s true.”
Swedish Prostitution Law Targets Buyers, but Some Say It Hurts Sellers.
By David Crouch.
GOTHENBURG, Sweden — Not far from the Sticky Fingers nightclub, three Romanian women were hunched against the cold on a street corner. When a man walked by, the women, in broken Swedish and English, tried to tempt him to buy sex.
On this dismal street in Gothenburg, Sweden’s second-largest city, the same scene plays out every Friday night. Until recently, Daniella, 34, who was brought to Sweden from Romania by a pimp 10 years ago, was a part of it.
Now, Daniella, who asked that her full name not be used, has walked away from that life. After the pimp was sent to jail for four years, she turned to a volunteer group for help finding a way off the streets and became part of a broad decline in prostitution in Sweden.
Sweden’s pioneering law criminalizing the purchase of sex while allowing its sale — putting the criminal burden on the buyer, not the prostitute, while providing more assistance to women who want to stop selling sex — has been considered a success and a model for other countries since it was introduced in 1999. A study issued Friday by a government agency in Stockholm found that street prostitution had been cut by more than half since 1995 and that the number of men admitting to having purchased sex was down more than 40 percent.
The findings were consistent with an official report completed by the Swedish government in 2010, which concluded that the law had reduced trafficking and transformed attitudes toward buying sex.
Norway and Iceland adopted legislation similar to Sweden’s in 2009, and leading British politicians have called for the same. Last year, the European Parliament resolved to “reduce the demand for prostitution by punishing the clients.” Sweden itself is considering extending its law to make it a crime for Swedish citizens to buy sex abroad.
But as Sweden assesses the lessons of its approach, it continues to grapple with issues that could limit progress in reducing prostitution and sex trafficking, including the effects of technology on the market for sex and the rights of prostitutes themselves.
A review of research on the legislation that the Swedish Association for Sexuality Education commissioned from Malmo University found that it was unclear to what extent mobile phones and the Internet, rather than the law, may have accelerated the reduction in street prostitution by bringing buyers and sellers together electronically.
The stigma against prostitutes remains widespread, the review also found, making it difficult for women to get help from social services and the police, and stoking their fear of eviction or loss of custody of their children.
The law is forcing women who sell sex into more dangerous situations, it said, arguing that transactions have become faster and more furtive because men are afraid of the police, leading women to jump into cars without first checking if the driver is drunk, high or otherwise threatening. And the number of Swedes in favor of a ban on the sale of sex as well as its purchase appears to have grown.

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